Handicrafts in Odisha (Orissa)

Terracotta & Pottery
Terracotta & Pottery

Pottery is marked as the beginning of civilization. Till now pottery is not only existed but also comes with a newly developed and innovative approach. Terracotta and Pottery is one of the approved craft most in every district. There are more than 10,000 terracotta artisans in the state who are producing traditional, decorative and utility terracotta-based items. Some of the focused terracotta craft pockets are Sonepur, Barapalli, Haldharpur, Nuagaon, Lunukua and Kusumi etc.

Silver Filigree
Silver Filigree

Odisha's silver and filigree work particularly are unique examples of artistic excellence rarely to be seen in any other part of India. Silver wires, extremely delicate, are shaped into intricate designs. Forms of animals and birds, articles of daily use like vermilion receptacles are also made out of silver wires- Filigree ornaments, especially brooches and earrings are very popular among Indian women. Cuttack is world-famous for filigree work.

The quality of silver used for making these products is of a high standard and have up to 90 percent of purity. Silver wires are drawn through small holes and then soldered to create an exquisite mesh-like article.

Silver Filigree work can be categorized under many items. Ornamental items like bangles, earrings, necklaces, brooches, pendants are a hot favorite amongst the ladies. Decorative items like temple mold, the cast of snakes and horses, animals and chariots are apt for drawing-room. The utilitarian items mainly consist of bowls, ashtrays, cups, vermillion container etc. Devotional items of silver are also used in the many temples of Odisha.

Horn Works
Horn Works

Odisha Horn Work is mystical and showcases an outstanding fashion design. The lively appearance, animation, and dynamism of the horn articles vie with the genuine objects of nature. In Paralakhemundi, many of the horn works boast of little touches of silver filigree that offer an unusual look to these items.

Paralakhemundi, located in Odisha's Gajapati district, horn articles of Paralakhemundi showcase the rich cultural heritage of the place.

In Cuttack, the horn and filigree works are blended to create decorative jewels as well as bangles. Several dexterous artisans of Odisha also make articles of daily use such as combs, pen-stands and flower vases using the horn of cattle. It is quite evident that when it comes to Horn Work, Odisha, quite a variety is on offer.

Tribal Jewellery
Tribal Jewellery

The tribals of Odisha craft out a lifestyle to the beat of ancient rhythms, in the process of creating amazing works of artistry that touch even the most mundane and utilitarian object of everyday use. Such as stunning Handmade Dhokra ornaments like necklace, bracelets, earrings of great beauty depicting humans in a circle of tight embrace. zinc, copper and tin transformed into the poetry called Dhokra. It is handcrafted by artisans in Odisha using the 5000-year-old lost wax technique. A perfect mix of the old and the new, this jewelry is a modern take on of ancient jewelry. A tribal jewelry piece is a unique piece of accessory to compliment your outfits.

Brass and Bell Metal Ware
Brass and Bell Metal Ware

Brass and bell metal's fine engraving works you can find in different utensils, bronze bangles and pots are important aspects of Odishan art. Artifacts made of metal, particularly brass, find pride of place in the homes of Odisha. Beautiful lamps and lamp-stands are used during the worship of deities. Rice-measuring bowls made of brass are used in many homes. The artisans also make elephants and horses from brass and decorate them with intricate designs. Containers of brass for betel-chewers are designed both to be useful and ornamental. There are household articles and utensils made out of brass and bell metal and they are of different shapes and sizes. The brassware of Odisha reveals the high workmanship of the artisans and their flair for innovation.

Stone and Wood Carving
Stone and Wood Carving

Stone and Wood cravings are among the age-old crafts of Odisha. The descendants of the artisans who once scaled the dizzy heights of excellence in temple building have kept the sculptural tradition alive through their hereditary craft of stone carving. The carved products include replicas of temples, images of gods and goddesses, the Konark wheel and horse, and decorative figurines like alasa kanya(the indolent damsel), salabhanjika(lady leaning against a sal branch), surasundari (heavenly. beauty), lekhika(lady writing a letter) etc. which are popular items of household decoration. Wood carvings of Odisha are almost equally popular. They differ from the artifacts of other states in so far as they are plain and shining with smooth polish and without any paint or coating of lacquer work on them.

Golden Grass and Cane Work
Golden Grass and Cane Work

The golden grass work in Odisha includes baskets, hand fans and table mats. Floor mats are also woven out of golden grass which is a local product, Today the demand for these goods has increased and this testifies to their beauty, utility and lasting quality. Cane is used for weaving baskets and several items of furniture.

Jhoti Chita Muruja
Jhoti, Chita, Muruja

Jhoti chita is a traditional Odia white art mostly shown in rural areas of Odisha. It is made from rice paste and a piece of cloth surrounded by a stick is used to create beautiful patterns. People also use their bare fingers to make jhoti chita. They can be created over walls and on floors. Murja is the dry rice powder or white stone powder that has been utilized on the floor to draw beautiful pictures.

Applique Art
Applique Art

Tailors at Pipli execute applique works, which are in great demand. Giant-sized umbrellas of applique work are produced for use on festive occasions. Also used as garden umbrellas in sprawling lawns, they lend grace and color to any gathering. Heart-shaped fans, big and small canopies and wall-hangings are also prepared out of applique work. The tailors cut out figures of animals, birds, flowers as well as geometrical shapes out of richly colored cloth and these are arranged symmetrically on another piece of cloth and sewn in place to produce an eye-catching design. The rich splashes of yellow, white, green, blue, red and black colors dazzle the eyes of the onlookers and set the festive mood. Bags of various shapes and sizes are also made with applique motifs. Applique chhatris(umbrellas) and tarasas(heart-shaped wooden structures covered with applique work and supported on pikes) are used to lend color to religious processions. Large applique canopies are an integral part of marriage celebrations. In temples, canopies are hung over the deities to protect them from falling dirt.

Paintings
Paintings

Odisha has an age-old tradition of Painting which stretches from the prehistoric rock shelters to the temples and maths of this century. Out of these traditional paintings, the prominent one is Pattachitra Painting, Tribal Painting and Rock Painting.

Pattachitra
Pattachitra

One of the oldest forms of artwork found in Odisha, Pattachitra art is fascinating, depicts Hindu mythological tales and wonders. Primarily based on these stories from the past, Pattachitra art is vibrant, unique and is a fine display of dexterous Indian craftsmanship at its best. This kind of artwork has a traditional appeal and is intrinsic with Indian values, customs and rituals, which are a part and parcel of the Hindu faith and religion. What started off as different forms of paintings has however evolved to become an immense facet of Indian accessories and other forms of traditional fashion as well.

Puppets & Masks
Puppets & Masks

Odisha has a history of folk theatre also known locally as Jatra. The characters of these jatras are made of wood and vividly painted. They are dressed according to the characters played by them and are controlled by strings.

The nomadic performers of Odisha stage play based on the epics and other historical characters. According to the character played they use masks. These masks are made of wood, sholapith, and papier-mache. The wood used is predominantly light driftwood. The masks thus made are then brightly colored. Most artisans for this craft are located in and around Puri.

© 2020 orissatourism.org | All Rights Reserved